Maybe Occupy was too successful a brand in that it sometimes disguised how much this movement was part of popular surges going on around the world: the Arab Spring (including the three successful revolutions, the ongoing Syrian civil war, uprisings in Yemen, and more); the student uprisings in Montreal, Mexico, and Chile that have continued to develop and broaden; the economic revolts in Spain, Greece, and Britain; the ongoing demonstrations and insurrections around Africa; even various acts of resistance in India, Japan, China, and Tibet, some large and powerful. Because, in case you hadn’t noticed, these days a lot of the world is in some form of rebellion, insurrection, or protest.

And the family resemblances matter. If you add them all up, you see a similar fury at greed, political corruption, economic inequality, environmental devastation, and a dimming, shrinking future.

[T]he one-year anniversary [of Occupy Wall Street] is likely to produce a lot of mainstream media stories that will assure you Occupy was only a bunch of tents that came down last year, that it was naïve, and that’s that. Don’t buy it. Don’t be reasonable, don’t be realistic, and don’t be defeated. A year is nothing and the mainstream media is oblivious to where power lies and how change works, but that doesn’t mean you need to be.

That same media will tell you 99 ways from Tuesday how powerless you are and how all power is made by men in suits who won or bought elections, but don’t buy that either. Instead, notice how terrified Vladimir Putin was of three young performers in bright-colored balaclavas, and how equally frightened Wall Street is of us. They remember something we tend to forget: together we are capable of being remarkably powerful. We can make history, and we have, and we will, but only when we keep our eyes on the prize, pitch a big tent, and don’t stop until we get there.

kimball12:

#occupy seems to be scaring Bloomberg again (Taken with Instagram)

kimball12:

#occupy seems to be scaring Bloomberg again (Taken with Instagram)

Watch the anniversary of OWS

(Source: modestinferno)

Twitter hands over Occupy protester’s tweets to NY judge

aliceincrohnsland:

via RT:

Twitter has delivered prosecutors in New York with a record of tweets sent by one of its users arrested last year during an Occupy Wall Street protest after being threatened in court with hefty fines if they didn’t comply.

Around three months’ worth of tweets from an account registered to Brooklyn-based writer Malcolm Harris was surrendered to authorities Friday morning following nearly a year of courtroom arguments. A Manhattan judge ignored repeated attempts to appeal the order and earlier this month told the defense that Twitter had until September 15 to follow through or face penalties for contempt.

Harris was charged with disorderly conduct after being arrested with roughly 700 other demonstrators on the Brooklyn Bridge last fall during the early days of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Prosecutors have demanded access to his Twitter history in hopes of refuting Harris’ defense “that the police either led or escorted the defendant into stepping onto the roadway of the Brooklyn Bridge.”

On behalf of both Harris and Twitter, attorneys for the defense fought unsuccessfully to protect the tweets from being handed over. Last month, the social networking site filed an appeal to the order, arguing, “Twitter users own their Tweets and should have the right to fight invalid government requests.”

Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Matthew Sciarrino Jr. claimed the contrary, however, ruling last month, “If you post a tweet, just like if you scream it out the window, there is no reasonable expectation of privacy.”

“I can’t put Twitter or the little blue bird in jail, so the only way to punish is monetarily,” the judge added.

Friday morning, Harris’ attorney spoke to the media and voiced his discontent with the ruling.

‘‘We are disappointed that Twitter is essentially giving up the fight,’’ lawyer Martin Stolar told the Associated Press.

Weeks earlier, Twitter attorney Benjamin Lee tweeted, “Twitter users own their Tweets. They have a right to fight invalid government requests, and we continue to stand with them in that fight.”

thepeoplesrecord:

As the one year anniversary of OWS approaches, where do we stand?
September 15, 2012
To put it in a nutshell: the Zuccotti encampment model might have passed its heyday, but the spirit of Occupy is still very much alive … evolving and inspiring, expanding our understanding of the possible, exploding our political imagination. Before S17 we relied on the same dinosaur paradigm of the dusty old left. We looked backward for inspiration instead of forward. With Occupy we jumped over that old dead goat. Now it’s time to leap fresh again.
Look at what’s happening in Quebec … the boldness of the media democracy movement in Mexico … the teenagers leading an education revolt in Chile … the Pussy Riot inspired art war unnerving Putin in Russia … and the new post-capitalist ways of living being forged in Greece and Spain. Witness the growing tempo of green riots across China, the South African miner strikes, the corruption protests of India, the freedom fight in Bahrain, the tremors of dissent in Saudi Arabia, the total loss of confidence in America’s corporate-funded Coke-Pepsi election show. Then, add to that the crippling droughts, looming food scarcity, the end of easy oil and the tipping points hovering ominously on the horizon …
Occupy began as a primal scream against the monied corruption of our democracy … but after a year of struggling against an unrepentant corporatocracy, our goals are now deeper, our dreams wilder. We see a common thread emerging — a blue-green-black hybrid politics — that unites and elevates our movement:
On the blue front, we eradicate the commercial virus infecting our culture – we liberate the flow of information, champion the leakers, protect anonymity, and break up the corporate media monopolies with outrageous creative hacks.
On the deep green front, we push towards a decisive victory in the forty-year environmentalist struggle – we institute a binding international accord on climate change, pursue a worldwide de-growth economic agenda funded by a Robin Hood Tax and establish an across the board true cost market regime in which the price of every product tells the ecological truth.
On the black front, we restore the dominion of people over corporations by all nonviolent means necessary – we unleash a visceral wave of jams, meme wars and cultural interventions against the monied elite, the financial fraudsters, paid-for politicians and megacorporate outposts in our cities. We kill off criminal corporations like Goldman Sachs, Exxon, Pfizer, Monsanto, Philip Morris and others that have broken the public trust.
A radical blue-green-black transformation of the current global system might sound hopefully idealistic, foolishly utopian, even radically impossible, but remember that on July 13 2011, when the first call for occupying the iconic center of global capitalism went out, it sounded all too naively absurd as well.
#PIRATEPARTYUSA#PIRATEPARTYUK#PIRATEPARTYCANADA#PIRATEPARTYAUSTRALIA
If you are in America, vote strategically but keep your eyes on the horizon. Our civilization remains steadfast on its economic, ecological and psychological crash course and sometime over the next few months, maybe in the new year, a galvanizing global moment of truth will happen … be ready for it … prepare yourself … stay loose, play jazz, keep the faith, wake up every morning ready to live without dead time … Capitalism is heaving and our movement has just begun.
On September 17, meet at dawn ready to rumble on Wall Street:http://s17nyc.org/schedule/s17/
for the wild,Culture Jammers HQ
Occupywallstreet.org
Via Adbusters

thepeoplesrecord:

As the one year anniversary of OWS approaches, where do we stand?

September 15, 2012

To put it in a nutshell: the Zuccotti encampment model might have passed its heyday, but the spirit of Occupy is still very much alive … evolving and inspiring, expanding our understanding of the possible, exploding our political imagination. Before S17 we relied on the same dinosaur paradigm of the dusty old left. We looked backward for inspiration instead of forward. With Occupy we jumped over that old dead goat. Now it’s time to leap fresh again.

Look at what’s happening in Quebec … the boldness of the media democracy movement in Mexico … the teenagers leading an education revolt in Chile … the Pussy Riot inspired art war unnerving Putin in Russia … and the new post-capitalist ways of living being forged in Greece and Spain. Witness the growing tempo of green riots across China, the South African miner strikes, the corruption protests of India, the freedom fight in Bahrain, the tremors of dissent in Saudi Arabia, the total loss of confidence in America’s corporate-funded Coke-Pepsi election show. Then, add to that the crippling droughts, looming food scarcity, the end of easy oil and the tipping points hovering ominously on the horizon …

Occupy began as a primal scream against the monied corruption of our democracy … but after a year of struggling against an unrepentant corporatocracy, our goals are now deeper, our dreams wilder. We see a common thread emerging — a blue-green-black hybrid politics — that unites and elevates our movement:

On the blue front, we eradicate the commercial virus infecting our culture – we liberate the flow of information, champion the leakers, protect anonymity, and break up the corporate media monopolies with outrageous creative hacks.

On the deep green front, we push towards a decisive victory in the forty-year environmentalist struggle – we institute a binding international accord on climate change, pursue a worldwide de-growth economic agenda funded by a Robin Hood Tax and establish an across the board true cost market regime in which the price of every product tells the ecological truth.

On the black front, we restore the dominion of people over corporations by all nonviolent means necessary – we unleash a visceral wave of jams, meme wars and cultural interventions against the monied elite, the financial fraudsters, paid-for politicians and megacorporate outposts in our cities. We kill off criminal corporations like Goldman Sachs, Exxon, Pfizer, Monsanto, Philip Morris and others that have broken the public trust.

A radical blue-green-black transformation of the current global system might sound hopefully idealistic, foolishly utopian, even radically impossible, but remember that on July 13 2011, when the first call for occupying the iconic center of global capitalism went out, it sounded all too naively absurd as well.

#PIRATEPARTYUSA
#PIRATEPARTYUK
#PIRATEPARTYCANADA
#PIRATEPARTYAUSTRALIA

If you are in America, vote strategically but keep your eyes on the horizon. Our civilization remains steadfast on its economic, ecological and psychological crash course and sometime over the next few months, maybe in the new year, a galvanizing global moment of truth will happen … be ready for it … prepare yourself … stay loose, play jazz, keep the faith, wake up every morning ready to live without dead time … Capitalism is heaving and our movement has just begun.

On September 17, meet at dawn ready to rumble on Wall Street:
http://s17nyc.org/schedule/s17/

for the wild,
Culture Jammers HQ

Occupywallstreet.org

Via Adbusters

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Negotiations look promising for CTU; strike could end MondaySeptember 15, 2012
This weekend—after five days on strike, daily mass marches, and marathon negotiations—the fired-up, 29,000-member Chicago Teachers Union and its supporters are holding another, potentially bigger rally. And CTU president Karen Lewis once again is leading her team in long hours of negotiations.
But the weekend’s actions may have a new, celebratory edge: The strike may be over Sunday on terms that teachers can accept, Lewis announced on Friday afternoon. In statements to the press, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and public school officials described having reached a “tentative framework” for a deal.
Negotiators face one last hurdle: They must translate that framework into satisfactory concrete contractual language.
“They are very suspicious,” Lewis said of teachers (who also “like to read”). “We have been a little burnt by the Board in the past.” Last year Lewis and CTU legislative staff signed off on a bill without reading closely the final version, which contained language to which the union objected.
Lewis, a tough bargainer who appears to have strong support from union members (with help from Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s provocative stance), would not detail the basic agreements for the framework of the proposed contract.
On one of the more contentious issues, how to evaluate teacher performance, Lewis said, ”I think we feel very comfortable” with the framework. But she said there was no decision on the length of the contract: CTU wants two years, the school board four.
At this point, despite the lack of confirmed details, the union appears to have substantially won some points, blunted the most antagonistic Chicago Public Schools demands, and reached tolerable compromises on the stickiest topics, like job security. The union did not apparently achieve many of its goals for improving the schools, such as more arts education and smaller classes (although unenforced guidelines for class size reportedly will remain in the contract), but thanks to a recent law, the Board of Education was not legally obliged to bargain on most of those school-improvement proposals.
Although public irritation with the strike could grow if it drags on, support is currently high. Teachers are coming to Saturday’s demonstration from other cities and states—including some from Madison, Wis., who are also celebrating Friday’s appellate court decision overturning the bulk of Gov. Scott Walker’s anti-union legislation. 
And a new poll out Thursday showed 55.5 percent of Chicago households supporting the strike, including 66 percent of parents of public school children and nearly two-thirds of blacks and Latinos polled. Asked who was to blame, 53 percent blamed management—34 percent Emanuel, 19 percent the school board—and 29 percent blamed the teachers.
With the union still holding a strong position in the conflict, union leaders want to nail down the details of every provision before presenting the contract on Sunday to roughly 800 union delegates. If the delegates are satisfied, they could suspend the strike and send the contract to the members for ratification.
But with new costs—a result of Emanuel’s longer school day and the new contract’s compensation for that work—in a system that is already facing a budget shortfall and with the school system reportedly planning to close as many as 100 schools (and opening many new charters), teachers face tumultuous times ahead, even if they win a good contract now.
Source
The CTU strike really shows the power of collective action & a strike. Gains will not only be made for teachers, but Chicago students who deserve better learning environments, smaller classrooms & more resources. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Negotiations look promising for CTU; strike could end Monday
September 15, 2012

This weekend—after five days on strike, daily mass marches, and marathon negotiations—the fired-up, 29,000-member Chicago Teachers Union and its supporters are holding another, potentially bigger rally. And CTU president Karen Lewis once again is leading her team in long hours of negotiations.

But the weekend’s actions may have a new, celebratory edge: The strike may be over Sunday on terms that teachers can accept, Lewis announced on Friday afternoon. In statements to the press, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and public school officials described having reached a “tentative framework” for a deal.

Negotiators face one last hurdle: They must translate that framework into satisfactory concrete contractual language.

“They are very suspicious,” Lewis said of teachers (who also “like to read”). “We have been a little burnt by the Board in the past.” Last year Lewis and CTU legislative staff signed off on a bill without reading closely the final version, which contained language to which the union objected.

Lewis, a tough bargainer who appears to have strong support from union members (with help from Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s provocative stance), would not detail the basic agreements for the framework of the proposed contract.

On one of the more contentious issues, how to evaluate teacher performance, Lewis said, ”I think we feel very comfortable” with the framework. But she said there was no decision on the length of the contract: CTU wants two years, the school board four.

At this point, despite the lack of confirmed details, the union appears to have substantially won some points, blunted the most antagonistic Chicago Public Schools demands, and reached tolerable compromises on the stickiest topics, like job security. The union did not apparently achieve many of its goals for improving the schools, such as more arts education and smaller classes (although unenforced guidelines for class size reportedly will remain in the contract), but thanks to a recent law, the Board of Education was not legally obliged to bargain on most of those school-improvement proposals.

Although public irritation with the strike could grow if it drags on, support is currently high. Teachers are coming to Saturday’s demonstration from other cities and states—including some from Madison, Wis., who are also celebrating Friday’s appellate court decision overturning the bulk of Gov. Scott Walker’s anti-union legislation. 

And a new poll out Thursday showed 55.5 percent of Chicago households supporting the strike, including 66 percent of parents of public school children and nearly two-thirds of blacks and Latinos polled. Asked who was to blame, 53 percent blamed management—34 percent Emanuel, 19 percent the school board—and 29 percent blamed the teachers.

With the union still holding a strong position in the conflict, union leaders want to nail down the details of every provision before presenting the contract on Sunday to roughly 800 union delegates. If the delegates are satisfied, they could suspend the strike and send the contract to the members for ratification.

But with new costs—a result of Emanuel’s longer school day and the new contract’s compensation for that work—in a system that is already facing a budget shortfall and with the school system reportedly planning to close as many as 100 schools (and opening many new charters), teachers face tumultuous times ahead, even if they win a good contract now.

Source

The CTU strike really shows the power of collective action & a strike. Gains will not only be made for teachers, but Chicago students who deserve better learning environments, smaller classrooms & more resources. 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

anarcho-queer:

Hundreds of people are at Washington Square Park for an Opening Assembly. Hundreds more are a few blocks away at Zuccotti Park.

We’re on our way here. Really excited about all the one year stuff, starting now and continuing on for days. Come out if you can and look around your area to see if there are any 1 Year Anniversary events going on in your area. 

thepeoplesrecord:

anarcho-queer:

Hundreds of people are at Washington Square Park for an Opening Assembly. Hundreds more are a few blocks away at Zuccotti Park.

We’re on our way here. Really excited about all the one year stuff, starting now and continuing on for days. Come out if you can and look around your area to see if there are any 1 Year Anniversary events going on in your area. 

(via thepeoplesrecord)

jethroq:

thepeoplesrecord:

Egyptian anger at US goes beyond one movieSeptember 15, 2012
I have been watching events in the Middle East unfold from the American heartland. The reaction among many of the people there was a mix of shock, anxiety, and fear. They also wanted to know why people are storming U.S. diplomatic compounds. Americans are in disbelief that this is happening over a movie that no one has ever heard of, much less seen. In that they are correct.; Events in Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Sudan, and now Malaysia are far more complicated than an offensive movie and the madness of those who sought to provoke this violence by making it as well as those who have capitalized on it to encourage violence.
Consider Egypt, the place in the Muslim world that I know best. Many Egyptians—including, I am sure, President Mohammed Morsi—are deeply offended by The Innocence of Muslims but the resentment of the United States runs deep in Egypt. This is not an excuse, but Americans must understand the context in which their embassies and diplomats are being attacked. Yes, Washington has helped Egypt through infrastructure development, agricultural reform, public health, and myriad other areas; but the United States has, according to Egyptians, weakened their country through an alliance that subordinates Cairo’s interests to those of Washington (and by association those of Jerusalem). This sense of subordination is manifest in the U.S. embassy itself. To the average American it may seem innocuous enough, though it sits in a miniature “Green Zone”—which is actually at the insistence of the Egyptian government—a few blocks from Tahrir Square. That is Liberation Square. The embassy is easily spotted by just looking up from Tahrir because, at thirteen stories, it is one of the tallest buildings in the area. It looms over a traffic circle that features newsstands, travel agencies, formerly the Cairo Hilton, the Egyptian national museum, and the dregs of American fast food outlets—KFC, Hardee’s, and Pizza Hut.  It would be hard for a proud Egyptian nationalist not to notice the irony of it all.
No, the protests are not just about a movie. They are about perceived insults on Egyptians’ national pride and collective dignity that the United States has perpetrated for the previous three decades. It ranges from everything such as support for President Mubarak and Anwar Sadat before him, to U.S. patronage of Israel at the expense of Egypt and Arab causes, to the invasion of Iraq, which the vast majority of Egyptians deeply opposed, though Mubarak provided important assistance in that effort, to little slights like Ambassador Ann Patterson’s visit to a polling station during parliamentary elections last fall/winter. The cognitive dissonance is hard to get over for Americans, however. Washington has sought to help Egypt to the tune of $65 billion. For Egyptians the mistrust runs so deep, there is no such thing as American altruism. Under these circumstances, President Obama was exactly right when he questioned the quality of the U.S.-Egypt alliance.
Source
The writer makes a great point that seems so obvious to everyone but Americans. Why are people the slightest bit surprised that countries we have torn apart with imperialistic policies, war, unmanned drones & military presence furious with the US impeding upon its sovereignty? 
This goes much further back than this offensive Islamophobic film. The US has a long history of trampling on countries’ independence for its own gain. It’s what the US does best & has done since it began. 

It’s pretty clear to anyone who doens’t wear Islamophobia goggles, that these riots are far less about blasphemy, more about Yankee Go Home.

jethroq:

thepeoplesrecord:

Egyptian anger at US goes beyond one movie
September 15, 2012

I have been watching events in the Middle East unfold from the American heartland. The reaction among many of the people there was a mix of shock, anxiety, and fear. They also wanted to know why people are storming U.S. diplomatic compounds. Americans are in disbelief that this is happening over a movie that no one has ever heard of, much less seen. In that they are correct.; Events in Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Sudan, and now Malaysia are far more complicated than an offensive movie and the madness of those who sought to provoke this violence by making it as well as those who have capitalized on it to encourage violence.

Consider Egypt, the place in the Muslim world that I know best. Many Egyptians—including, I am sure, President Mohammed Morsi—are deeply offended by The Innocence of Muslims but the resentment of the United States runs deep in Egypt. This is not an excuse, but Americans must understand the context in which their embassies and diplomats are being attacked. Yes, Washington has helped Egypt through infrastructure development, agricultural reform, public health, and myriad other areas; but the United States has, according to Egyptians, weakened their country through an alliance that subordinates Cairo’s interests to those of Washington (and by association those of Jerusalem). This sense of subordination is manifest in the U.S. embassy itself. To the average American it may seem innocuous enough, though it sits in a miniature “Green Zone”—which is actually at the insistence of the Egyptian government—a few blocks from Tahrir Square. That is Liberation Square. The embassy is easily spotted by just looking up from Tahrir because, at thirteen stories, it is one of the tallest buildings in the area. It looms over a traffic circle that features newsstands, travel agencies, formerly the Cairo Hilton, the Egyptian national museum, and the dregs of American fast food outlets—KFC, Hardee’s, and Pizza Hut.  It would be hard for a proud Egyptian nationalist not to notice the irony of it all.

No, the protests are not just about a movie. They are about perceived insults on Egyptians’ national pride and collective dignity that the United States has perpetrated for the previous three decades. It ranges from everything such as support for President Mubarak and Anwar Sadat before him, to U.S. patronage of Israel at the expense of Egypt and Arab causes, to the invasion of Iraq, which the vast majority of Egyptians deeply opposed, though Mubarak provided important assistance in that effort, to little slights like Ambassador Ann Patterson’s visit to a polling station during parliamentary elections last fall/winter. The cognitive dissonance is hard to get over for Americans, however. Washington has sought to help Egypt to the tune of $65 billion. For Egyptians the mistrust runs so deep, there is no such thing as American altruism. Under these circumstances, President Obama was exactly right when he questioned the quality of the U.S.-Egypt alliance.

Source

The writer makes a great point that seems so obvious to everyone but Americans. Why are people the slightest bit surprised that countries we have torn apart with imperialistic policies, war, unmanned drones & military presence furious with the US impeding upon its sovereignty? 

This goes much further back than this offensive Islamophobic film. The US has a long history of trampling on countries’ independence for its own gain. It’s what the US does best & has done since it began. 

It’s pretty clear to anyone who doens’t wear Islamophobia goggles, that these riots are far less about blasphemy, more about Yankee Go Home.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via evil-trash-can-kid)